Paper , Shadows and Light. - James Good Tunnys view . Rock House and Edinburgh. Time after time have I gone and stood on the projecting rock below Playfairs monument on the Calton Hill and drawn inspiration from viewing Mr Adamson , placing a large square box upon a stand , covering his head with a focussing-cloth, introducing the slide counting the seconds by his watch, putting the cap on his lens , and retiring to what we now know to be the dark room . Oh!if only I could have got an introduction to these men , it would have been the consummation of my happiness !
James Good Tunny's view . Rock House and Edinburgh. "Time after time have I gone and stood on the projecting rock below Playfairs monument on the Calton Hill and drawn inspiration from viewing Mr Adamson , placing a large square box upon a stand , covering his head with a focussing-cloth, introducing the slide counting the seconds by his watch, putting the cap on his lens , and retiring to what we now know to be the dark room . Oh!if only I could have got an introduction to these men , it would have been the consummation of my happiness !
Paper , Shadows and Light. - Eashing Bridge. One of the ancient bridges on the river Wey built by the monks of Waverley Abbey. In the early 1850s the greatest Calotypist of his day, Benjamin Brecknell Turner , stood close to this spot and produced some of the most beautiful Calotypes . Unusually this was where he produced a landscape in portrait format may be the only one of the hundreds of Calotypes he took. Turner took his image from the other side of the bridge but the bank he stood on is now impossible to reach.He did however make a conventional landscape Calotype from this spot.It is held in the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Eashing Bridge. One of the ancient bridges on the river Wey built by the monks of Waverley Abbey. In the early 1850s the greatest Calotypist of his day, Benjamin Brecknell Turner , stood close to this spot and produced some of the most beautiful Calotypes . Unusually this was where he produced a landscape in portrait format may be the only one of the hundreds of Calotypes he took. Turner took his image from the other side of the bridge but the bank he stood on is now impossible to reach.He did however make a conventional landscape Calotype from this spot.It is held in the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Paper , Shadows and Light. - THe Dietzsch kiln at Betchworth. Samuel Buckles process Calotype. Calotype and a print in a day.It can be done but it is a full 14 hours from start to finish to make them archivally fixed with perfect light. it is amazing how the time flies by , but setting up the dark room , weighing chemicals , coating the paper , getting to and from the scene , exposing the calotype , developing the calotype , washing , fixing , washing , drying and then repeating most of the above all eat up time. 

THe Dietzsch kiln at Betchworth. Samuel Buckles process Calotype. Calotype and a print in a day.It can be done but it is a full 14 hours from start to finish to make them archivally fixed with perfect light. it is amazing how the time flies by , but setting up the dark room , weighing chemicals , coating the paper , getting to and from the scene , exposing the calotype , developing the calotype , washing , fixing , washing , drying and then repeating most of the above all eat up time. 

Paper , Shadows and Light. - In some conversation with M. Claudet about the wonderful art which he practised, he informed me, with the utmost gravity, that to achieve anything like success or eminence , it required the chemical knowledge of a Faraday, the optical knowledge of a Herschel, the artistic talent of a Reynolds or Rembrandt, and the indomitable pluck and energy of a Hannibal ; and under these circumstances he strongly dissuaded anyone from taking it up as an amusement. I thought of the assistant who had really executed the practical part of taking my picture. I smiled at the principals pompous and discouraging observations, and I determined one day to try my own hand at photography. “ Thomas Sutton
In some conversation with M. C'laudet about the wonderful art which he practised, he informed me, with the utmost gravity, that to achieve anything like success or eminence , it required the chemical knowledge of a Faraday, the optical knowledge of a Herschel, the artistic talent of a Reynolds or Rembrandt, and the indomitable pluck and energy of a Hannibal ; and under these circumstances he strongly dissuaded anyone from taking it up as an amusement. I thought of the assistant who had really executed the practical part of taking my picture. I smiled at the principal's pompous and discouraging observations, and I determined one day to try my own hand at photography. “ Thomas Sutton
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